Wednesday, 18 July 2012

Pearl Milk Tea (Sing Fat Ltd., Birmingham) [By @SpectreUK]



As an avid tea drinker I have never been able to get to grips with drinking cold tea. I have always found cold tea very depressing, as if most of the flavour has been lost with the heat; it’s a bit like cold chips in a way. I generally let a cup of tea get to just about drinking temperature so I don’t disturb others by slurping noisily and enjoy my strong sugarless beverage. Giving up sugar in tea a long time ago in favour of my waistline, I usually leave a teabag in the mug for ages, often forgetting all about it as it sinks to the bottom of the mug. There have been a couple of meetings at work in the past where I have been drinking a mug of tea and had a mouthful of teabag and a shirt covered in tea!

This Pearl Milk Tea was manufactured by Chiao Kuo, in Taiwan. The ingredients in the 320g can included; water (82.05%), sugar (8%), pearl starch balls (7.8%), black tea (0.45%), milk powder (1.7%), with nutritional values of 124 calories, 1g of fat and 24g of sugar. Opening the can straight from the fridge and pouring out the light milky tea coloured liquid, I noticed there were a good couple of centimetres of pearl starch balls languishing at the bottom of the glass. The drink had a strong and very sweet black tea taste to it, domineered by an almost condensed creamy milk flavour. Even though I’d given up sugar in tea sometime ago, I could definitely see the benefit of sugar in cold tea. I found this cold tea very refreshing after a hot bath, lip-lickingly creamy sweet and tasty. I even munched down the pearl starch balls at the bottom of the glass once I’d drunk off all the milky tea. I’d definitely have this again, and may even try other cold teas, but will most likely add sugar to cheer them up a bit!
By Spectre

2 comments:

S.Emerald said...

This looks quite good!

cinabar said...

Yep. Also in the Bullring in Birmingham there is a new pearl tea bar opened, going to have to go there and give it a try - this drink seems to be getting rather popular.