Monday, 3 December 2012

Laughing Cow Light – With Blue Cheese [By @cinabar]



I thought this was quite an innovative product idea when I first saw it. I do like having triangles of cream cheese in my lunch box, they make an easy lunch time snack, particularly spread on a couple of Ryvita. Having said I don’t think I’ve ever seen a blue cheese variety before so was looking forward to trying out the new one in the Laughing Cow range.
The packet clearly shows a big chunk of veined blue cheese on the box, and so I was a little surprised when I unwrapped the first cheese to find that it was plain creamy white through and through. When I thought about it, this made sense. After all adding the veins to a cream cheese does sound rather difficult if you think about the cheese making process, but still I had sort of expected to see a little colour.
I got on with spreading the cheese on a Ryvita and tucked in. The flavour was creamy, and the base taste of the regular Laughing Cow cheese shone through. The blue cheese flavour wasn’t too strong, but added a pleasant tang to the cheese that I really enjoyed. I like blue cheese, I know it’s a bit of an acquired taste, but I think it adds a lovely complexity to the cheese, so this is one I will be buying again. As I said if you are worried about the blueness being overpowering don’t, it adds just a good light does of flavour staying on the safe side. I would also recommend adding a sliced tomato to the mix as the flavours just complement one another perfectly. It’s also really low calorie as each cheese triangle has just 25 calories, but it still makes a tasty snack and adds a little gourmet style treat to lunch times.
By Cinabar

1 comment:

bob said...

Just tried this for the first time today, after reading the review, spreading it on a sesame rye Ryvita.
Quite nice and I could see melting it into a homemade cheese sauce to pour over macaroni as well.
Interestingly enough, the American version boasts ten additional calories per wedge!
I have the feeling that it's due to different calculations of K-cals, rather than the cheese being significantly more calorific.